United States midterms: Candidates who made history

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The first Muslim women have been elected to Congress, with Democrat Rashida Tlaib winning in MI and Ilhan Omar winning in Minnesota.

MA is getting its first black congresswoman while Arizona and Tennessee stand to elect their first woman senators as part of historic firsts following Tuesday's midterm elections.

This year's USA midterm elections have already made history, with a record number of women, Native Americans, and Muslim candidates running for office.

Democrats Ilhan Omar of Minnesota and Rashida Tlaib of MI will be the first Muslim women to serve in Congress, while Boston City Councilwoman Ayanna Pressley will represent Massachusetts' 7th Congressional District in the next Congress. In Georgia, the race for governor between Democrat Stacey Abrams - who is vying to be the first black woman governor in the US - and Republican Brian Kemp remains too close to call. Two others - Sharice Davids in Kansas' 3rd District and Deb Haaland in New Mexico's 1st District - will become the first Native American women in the chamber.

Female candidates won congressional seats and governorships in record numbers Tuesday night.

Half a century ago this week, New York's Shirley Chisholm was elected the first black woman in Congress, and several of the black women elected Tuesday have said their campaigns were inspired by her example. Although the House of Representatives fell under control of the Democrats, many were disappointed at the lack of greater electoral successes.

As of early Wednesday morning, CNN projected 98 women would win House races, with 33 women newly elected to the House and 65 female incumbents.

Sylvia Garcia and Veronica Escobar are the first Latinas to represent the state of Texas in the House of Representatives, after the state has sent more than 300 people to lower body of Congress since it joined the union in 1845.

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A lawyer and former MMA fighter, Davids became the first Native American congresswoman and the first lesbian congresswoman from Kansas. Texans elected Garcia, a former social worker and lawyer, by a wide margin against her Republican opponent.

At least 99 women will represent Americans in the House, surpassing the previous record of 84. South Dakota Republican US Representative Kristi Noem and Maine Democratic Attorney General Janet Mills were both elected to serve as governors of their home states.

For this wave of women leaders, the next few years are going to be about much more than stereotypical women's issues.

More women ran in congressional primaries this year than ever before, mostly as Democrats.

Women made history in the 2018 midterm elections.

"On the Democratic side, these races were viewed not only as a referendum on President Donald Trump, but also, in many cases, on his version of identity politics, which in its final days played to the fears of his base, a group that is largely white, male and Christian".

In Colorado, Jared Polis became the first openly gay governor in American history. As first-time women candidates running in MI and IL, they were part of a surge of new Congressional candidates aiming to flip GOP-held seats in crucial swing districts.

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, one of the Democrats who is considering the 2020 race, said that the two years since Trump ascended to the White House had ushered a new generation of women into public life.

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