Russian Federation probe 'under threat' after Sessions fired

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According to Business Insider, Jeff Sessions is no longer the US Attorney General.

The future of Robert Mueller's investigation into alleged Russian collusion with the Trump election campaign team is in question after the President sacked the man who oversees it all.

The demonstrations follow President Donald Trump's removal of Jeff Sessions as attorney general on Wednesday and his appointment of Matthew Whitaker as acting attorney general.

Mueller, who had reported to Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, now reports to the interim attorney general.

"Since the day I was honored to be sworn in as attorney general of the United States, I came to work at the Department of Justice every day determined to do my duty and serve my country", Sessions wrote.

He called on Whitaker to recuse himself from the Russian Federation probe because of previous comments about the investigation, echoing calls from other top Democrats.

When asked whether Whitaker would now assume control over the Mueller investigation, U.S. Justice Department spokesperson Sarah Flores said Whitaker would be "in charge of all matters" under the purview of the department.

In theory, Whitaker could order Mueller to limit the scope of his investigation or end it altogether.

The timing for when a final report would be submitted by the special counsel's office is still unclear, and sources say there is also no clear timeline for when Mueller will wrap his investigation.

In this April 24, 2014, file photo, then-Iowa Republican senatorial candidate and former U.S. Attorney Matt Whitaker watches before a live televised debate in Johnston, Iowa.

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Rosenstein, who appointed Mueller and has overseen his probe from the beginning will stay in his post, according to the official.

"Well I don't know why he'd be recused". Two things. First, the Democrats were delighted to have an Attorney General who recused himself from all matters relating to the Trump presidential campaign, including but not limited to Russian Federation, broadly construed.

Counselor to the president Kellyanne Conway suggested on Thursday morning that the question of whether Whitaker will recuse himself is absurd.

But Paul Rosenzweig, a former senior counsel to independent counsel Kenneth Starr, said he thought such a lawsuit would be unlikely to succeed because the US Supreme Court has said the president has wide latitude to fire executive branch officials.

In July 2017, he said during an interview on CNN that he could envision a scenario under which a temporary attorney general doesn't fire Mueller but rather "just reduces his budget to so low that his investigations grinds to nearly a halt".

"Trump's actions are being compared with those of U.S. President Richard Nixon in one of the most controversial episodes of the Watergate scandal, the Saturday Night Massacre", said organizers.

In July 2017 Mr Trump told the New York Times: "Sessions should have never recused himself, and if he was going to recuse himself, he should have told me before he took the job and I would have picked somebody else".

Schumer, in a separate press conference with reporters, warned that attempts by Sessions's successor or Trump to interfere with the investigation would spark a "constitutional crisis".

The mayor, who has gotten into it with the president on Twitter, added: "It is a shocking abuse of power".

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